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BP 'Making It Right'

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How can BP possibly make this right! These pictures were taken in the Fourchon area but this is spread throughout the southern marsh. The first Pic was taken Sept. 15, 2011. As you can see the grass is dead. Six month later after Hurricane Lee the marsh is gone. Hurricane Lee was nothing more the high tides that carried the dead grass off. I have been through many stronger hurricanes including Katrina and Rita that didn’t do this type of damage. The next time you drive down LA 1 or on the new bridge, look at the marsh and you’ll notice large brown patches of dead spots. Oil or dispersants sat in these pocket and killed the vegetation. The sad thing is that the spots will be completely gone within the next couple of month. Every time I see BP’s commercial, It turns my stomach and to the local sellouts that took the money to make the commercials. I hope you can sleep night!!!
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   seagu11
Devastated the marsh between Montegut and Point Aux Chene, but do not see anythng being done to save it or get back what was trampeled and washed away.
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   Dr. Spot
Also blame our Indian Emperor. Don't mind him giving the education establishment the finger since we're at the bottom nationally in all metrics, but I wish he would have the same devotion to our wetland erosion. But, he's too busy trying to become the next president to worry about our state very much.

You can also contact Garret Graves, the emperor's coastal restoration lackboy, and listen to the crickets chirp. Here is the website, and keep expectations very low:

http://www.gov.state.la.us/index.cfm?md=pagebuilder&tmp=home&cpid=26

Watch out for the positive spin. The proof is in pictures such as the ones posted here and the land loss we see with our eyes every season.
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   Bluewave1
I agree, BP walked away and left us holding the bag. There's not enough evidence ,it could be from something else, we have to do a study.blah,blah,blah. The state of La. has blinders on when it comes to long term effects of BP disaster.
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   Samarai
Don't let them do another study, cause the conclusion is we will need 10 more studies to verify that one study. By that time there won't be any more money left in the coffers.
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I would like to see a pic of that spot BEFORE April 2010 to make any judgement, and also a pic of the area just after April 2010 showing oil in the grass. The Sept 2011 pic to me shows a bunch of dead grass that was piled up after a high tide or storm. Not enough evidence here to blame BP.
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   seagu11
This looks like the location on the SONRIS 2010 aerial.
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   glhunter
As a father of two very young kids is makes me both very angry and sad to see our wetlands being destroyed. Whether this is BP's doing or something else, there is no mistaking that the wetlands are being destroyed. With pictures like these it is becoming more and more apparent that my kids will not be able to enjoy the same type of outdoor exposure as I did growing up. Does anybody know of an expert (non governmental) who can or can not verify that this type of marsh kill is because of the oil spill or just a natural kill? Would be very interesting to understand the cause! Very depressing!!!!!!
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   zoey123
To Cajunhopperv2:
I’ll have to look up some older pic. I took these pic when I noticed the dying grass in the summer time. Look closer and you’ll see it’s not piled up. I have pic of “piled up” grass after hurricane Lee raked up other sections of deed marsh. This is just a small snap shot of the problem WE have in Louisiana. We thought we were losing marshland b/f, “WELL” this has speed it up tremendously!
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   shadrig
Unfortunately, unless it can be absolutely, positively proven beyond any shadow of a doubt (and then some) that saltwater intrusion didn't have something/anything to do with it, the state and feds are going to look the other way. They already got their money. And yes, it is now their money. BP paid them, then broke and ran so why should any of them care?
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Stop blaming BP. The marsh has been disappearing for decades. When you start blaming BP, you look like a liberal whack job.

Point: When I was a kid, 1970's, we would go down between Boudreaux and Robinson Canals and would walk the oil platform roads to the west and fish the borrow canals and fill ice chests with 'Green Trout' on yellow beetle spins. It was freshwater marsh back then, into the 80's. We did it all on foot, no boat needed. Now, that is all open water, and salt/brackish at that.

Point 2: Going to our camp in Grand Isle, same time frame, when you crossed the bridge in Leeville, all you saw was solid marsh, now it is open water. BP didn't cause that.

We need to get off of this 'blame BP' bandwagon and push for the restoration of our marshes. My Dad did studies dating back to the early 70's on this very issue, and the long term solution is diversions from the Miss. River and to push the saltwater line south. But this will piss off the fishermen who can now catch limits of specks where 50 years ago you caught limits of Bream and Bass, and it will also piss off the oystermen, who don't have to travel so far anymore to fill their boats.

There.
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   shadrig
I too drove Hwy 1 back in the 60's and 70's and remember seeing nothing but marsh. No one here will deny that saltwater intrusion is and has been the biggest problem for decades and has to be addressed. And I agree that freshwater diversion is the solution. But, that's not going to wash away the oil. There is STILL oil in the marshes and sand from the central Louisiana coast to Florida, still oil under the sand of the Fourchon, Grand Isle and Grand Terre beaches. Go dig down a little way and see for yourself. BP said they would 'make it right'. They haven't.
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I guess I am missing the point of this post. I drive through Golden Meadow, Fourchon, Venice, Grand Isle, Delacroix, Shell Beach, etc. and it's as beautiful as ever. The fish population is as strong as ever, especially offshore, and the other wildlife is as plentiful as ever. Sorry your little patch of grass is gone, but you do realize that kind of thing happens ALL THE TIME naturally?? I lost a whole summer of fishing and I'm none too happy about that but I'm not sure what your gripe is all about.
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   glhunter
According to some, there is nothing to see here! It is easier to turn the other way instead of looking into a proble. Yes I stress PROBLEM. This happens all of the time??? The the marsh is as beautiful as ever???? Saltwater intrusion in Fourchon??? I agree that this may or may not be a product of the oil spill but according to the 2010 pics and the current pics something must have happened. We may never know, but apparently this is a issue that ALL sportsman who care about our coast should be concerned about.
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I don't want to seem argumentative; I'm apparently somewhat ignorant on the subject. What exactly is the 'PROBLEM'? What is the actual negative effect experienced by 'all sportsman' from these potential causes that you're naming??
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What the heck is it??? I went to our camp in Grand Isle for the first time this year and it literally took my breath away. ALL of the marsh looks like it is DEAD!!!

Does anyone know if there has been any sort of information on dispersants and our marsh grass??? If you have any information (other than your opinion) PLEASE get in touch with our editor Andy Crawford, andyc@lasmag.com

Your opinions are encouraged here in the forum and in our letters to the editor section in the magazine.

Say a prayer.
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   zoey123
Are ya’ll on BP‘s payroll (deerhunter1234/cajunhopperv2) 1st it was “I would like to see a pic of that spot before April 2010 to make any judgement.” I’m not asking you to make a judgment on this. WTFDUTUR. There are no piles of grass in those pics. I am down there quit a bit and claim to be an avid sportsman and conservationist. I have been a camp owner down there since the 80’s’s and have never seen anything like this. The whole reason I took the pics back then is b/c I could tell something was wrong! When have you ever seen a large plot of dead grass during the summer when it should be green and healthy?
Your other point is obvious to us “WACK JOBS”. “The marsh has been disappearing for decades”. REALLY!! “Salt water intrusion in Fouchon”! WOW! I think that happens every day in that area. I realize we need diversions and other restoration project. That’s not what my “agenda” is about! I’m simply showing a small snap shot of what is happening!
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There is a change in Venice fishing that Ray Charles could see. The Trout have left for the most part. Other areas are producing more Trout than ever before. Duh. They all swam away from the problems. Your not a whacko. The grass isn't dying from salt water. The Trout didn't leave because they do that every 5o years in Venice. Until people start talking about the problems nothing will be done. Your right about one thing your government doesnt care. They are too busy working on how to find votes from the non contributing class to worry about the real world......
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   10_foe
All of the marsh you see dying between Leevile and Grand Isle is being killed by a fungus. It is a fungus that has been a problem in south Louisiana for a long time, but generally only results in small brown spots. The effects from last year's drought allowed the fungus to wreak havoc on an already stressed marsh.
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quote:
All of the marsh you see dying between Leevile and Grand Isle is being killed by a fungus. It is a fungus that has been a problem in south Louisiana for a long time, but generally only results in small brown spots. The effects from last year's drought allowed the fungus to wreak havoc on an already stressed marsh.

end quote.

Same fungus hit back aound 2006 or 2007, there were comments on here as well as in the magazine about the dead marsh grass.
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   Dr. Spot
Cajunhopper says 'the long term solution is diversions from the Miss. River and to push the saltwater line south.' I disagree. I hate freshwater diversions, but strongly support river diversions. We've already tried a freshwater diversion at Delacroix, and the wetland loss is accelerating after each hurricane storm surge since freshwater plant root systems are shallow and get pulled up.

I'm all for opening the river, but not for just making an area a bass mecca and creating non-hurricane resilent floating vegetation.

At the same time, the situation is serious enough that a diversion is not enough. A river diversion is just part of the puzzle as a long-term solution, but we need to save what is left. The situation now requires manmade intervention with sediment pipes, sediment dumps, replanting of marsh grass, etc., and its going to require hundreds of people in the marsh for at least two decades. Anything less will not work anymore, our worthless politicians took too long.

If this message resonates with at least a couple of open-minded people, then I haven't wasted my time.
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   aguidry
I strongly agree that bp is not at fault here, and NO I am NOT on their payroll nor did I ever recieve ANY money from them. I work down in fourchon and drive there 7 days a week. It's not BP that killed the marsh grass its all the dead marsh grass that floated up and sat on top of the green grass and suffocated it. For instance, if its despersants in the water why did it kill some grassy areas and not others? Look at the area from the flood gates south to bobby lynn's, all the dead marsh grass still sitting on top the once green marsh, it smothered it and next surge that passes will wash it all out and there will be no grass. What should have been done instead of the state wasting money after the storm and trying to pick all that Ramassee up with their little excavators is buy a box of matches and burn it. It worked really good at my camp and the grass is beautiful and green as can be. When you burn the marsh the minerals from the burnt grass act as fertilizer for new growth. So before you go pointing fingers look at the whole big picture.
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