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hog trap design

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does anyone have a good, easy design for pig traps, i would prefer the gate that allows additional pigs in. i have a lease near the Alabama river and we have a significant pig problem

thanks in advance
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You should google it. Tons of pics and plans on web. Looks like you need a big one!!
Good luck.
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   JB1979
I read about one that works the same way a crab trap does. It's built out of hog wire(panels), fence post and T-Post. Arrange your panels in a large circle making one end almost come together to make a 'throat'. You have to cut the ends of the hog wire so it'll make barbed ends. The hogs push their way in but when they try and go out it should be closed enough so they cant. I think you get the idea. Like cork said goggle it, thats where I found this set up. I have to admit I never tried it but it makes since and sounds easy. I think the panels come in 18' sections and should be around $25.00-$35.00 each.Looks like you you need something that holds a lot. Good luck!
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   Doug8453
Look up Jager pro on the internet best system I've seen yet.
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Check this out, it is relatively cheap and easy to build and works great.

www.hogtrapping.com
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   jls
My dad has 3 Traps 4ftx8ft 2/drop Doors 1 w/swing door, Swing will keep letting them in Works too
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   Ricky Pon
Alright if you have time or are bored, get ya drinkin buddies and try this out. Take your truck to where that photo is and power brake some ruts about 5-8 inches deep about 15 or so feet long. Pour some corn and molasses all over in the ruts. Make you a GROUND stand either behind the ruts or directly in front of it. You and the buddies get high powered rifles and wait for them to pile in a straight line.
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Now thats something else! I am going to try that out.
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Ours are 4'x4'x8' overall. The frames are 1in. angle iron and the walls, floor, and tops are cattle panel fencing. I've tested a swing door vs a vertical sliding door side by side and because the sliding door design is open initially it did much better overall. So, if you buy or build a swing-door trap make sure it's one that does have a latch and trip system so that it's initially open.
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   Ricky Pon
Definitely fun, cheap, and easy in my book.

Big red if your serious about it, shoot me an email and ill give some well needed tips for the best outcome.
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Hey man i noticed your from Thibodaux La., would you happen to know a guy named Ross Lundgren from there?
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   jls
You need 8x4 trap w/swing door .............

Home | How To Articles

Swing-Door Style Portable Hog Trap
> Next: Using the Trap

This style of trap is the best portable trap style that we've found. We prefer the swing-style door as opposed to a root-style door -- a hog's natural tendency is to push up on things which makes the root-up door easier to escape from.

click for larger image

click for larger image

Materials:

Frame: 1/4' steel rod or rebar or 1' square tubing
Sides: 4' cattle panels (bull fencing)
Spring for swing door (galvanized)
Heavy duty hinges
Note: Excercise extreme caution if welding galvanized materials.

Building the Trap Frame

The standard size for hog traps is 4x8 feet. The height will depend on the size of your cattle panels, (usually 52'). If your use these dimensions, use this cuts list:

Cuts list using framing material

Long sides: 8' x 4
Front/back cross pieces: 46' x 4
Upright pieces: 50' x 12

Construct your frame first by framing the two long 8' x 4' sides first. Use four uprights: one for each side, and two evenly spaced in the middle for added support. Though the picture doesn't show these additional uprights, we recommend them.

Then space your two completed sides 46' apart and weld in the front and back cross pieces. Now add one upright in the middle of the back, leaving the final three for your door assembly and door jamb.

The cattle panels should be tack welded to the frame wherever possible.

It is not necessary to include a bottom on the trap if the trap is heavy enough, though most include it. If you will ever want to transport the live hog in the trap, you'll need the bottom.

Door

Make the door separately and the install into the completed trap frame. For the recommend door of 24' x 49', use these cuts:

Tall: 47' x 2
Main cross pieces: 24' x 2
Interior cross pieces: 22' x 4

You want the door to fit in the trap with 1/2' clearance top and bottom. Assemble the door so that the top and bottom pieces overlap the upright pieces, resulting in the 24' x 49' door. Evenly space and weld in the interior cross pieces. Cover in paneling.

Weld your completed door frame to the hinges, then to one of the remaining uprights. Position the entire assembly inside the trap frame so that the door closes against the side of the trap as shown in the pictures. The door should strike the edge of the trap at least 12' before the front of the trap. Weld in place.

Where the door closes against the frame, add the remaining two uprights to form a door jamb. This needs to be tough so that the hog can not escape.

Spring

The spring should have enough tension that it pulls the door closed after the trap is set, but not so much that small hogs can push it open from the outside after it has been closed. Attach to the door and then to the front corner of the trap.

> Next: Using the Trap
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If you want little fun go to youtube and watch the jager pro guys eliminate hogs. BTW they also have hog traps that have more thoughtful and experience design in them than anything I've ever seen.
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   jls
We have both type traps drop&swing door&both work well
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   Ricky Pon
No idea who that is.
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