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Feral Hogs and Night Hunting

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To the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries
Office of Wildlife

Gentlemen,

Much research and effort has been done to combat the explosion of feral hogs in many states across the country and especially in the south. Texas has been battling feral hogs and as a result has modified their hunting regulations to empower their ranchers, general citizenry and hunting public to battle this threat. They did this by allowing them to take feral hogs by any means, at night, and with no requirements for special permissions or calls to the local authorities.

I have lived in and around the Acadiana area all of my life, most of it living on my family’s farm just north of Crowley. Over the past few years, I have seen an outright explosion of feral hogs at a staggering rate. My friends and family have had to battle these feral hogs that destroy our land by means of trapping, hunting, and the use of catch dogs. The feral hog population will soon be out of control in Louisiana as it is in other states.

It is my opinion that there should be no restrictions to reducing the feral hog population by hunting from the state of Louisiana. I am speaking about the regulatory restriction for night hunting nuisance hogs between the September 1st and the last day of February. There should be no valid reason to stop the hunting public from attempting to harvest these nuisance hogs at night any time of the year.

Additionally, Louisiana has one thing that other states do not have that makes this state the most able to eradicate this problem….. Cajuns that eat cracklins, boudin, hog head cheese, and pork stew!

All joking aside, if we don’t make educated rational decisions about how to effectively battle this problem, we will fall fate to the over population of feral pigs and the problem will spread at a rate until it will no longer be manageable.

Let us night hunt feral pigs year round with any means possible, period.

Just my two cents….

Duckaholic
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
You want to let t-boy go out with a light and shine for hogs any time? When that first big buck gets the light in his eyes, t-boy gonna quit worrying bout hogs real quick!
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
T-Boy is doing that anyway! Thieves, crooks and outlaws don't follow rules my friend! We all know that. The logic of not trusting licensed legal hunters to do the right thing by restricting their privileges is ridiculous. My post is not meant to be political but, Freedoms and logic are always sacrificed in the name of safety and protection.

Just look across the Sabine River and do what they do, it's that simple. It's stupid to watch a train coming and not get off the tracks...
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
How did I get dragged into this?! lol
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
haha you must look guilty TBOY lol
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
HA! LOL, sorry TBOY!
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
All will be forgiven, just bring me a pork roast!
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
Build traps and your problems will be solved. To only consider night hunting with guns as a reasonable response to an increase in minor damage from a controllable source is derelict at best. Just build a trap. You can not kill more than a proper trap can catch at one single time. Thats a guarantee.
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
a friend had a hog infestation, he built two traps, caught 70 the fist year, then 20 the next, now they know its a trap, they learn when they are still on the momma, the hogs are still tearing up the land & won't go in a trap, they eat all the corn on the out side, the little ones go in the trap & eat the corn. john
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
Trapping defiantly catches more hogs than you can kill in any type of hunting. You would grow old trying to kill hogs from a deer stand. My comments are mainly about hunting restrictions that have no logical background. It makes no sense to only allow something part of the year when there is a known problem and we should utilize all methods available to combat the problem before it gets out of hand.

I have similar thoughts on light geese harvesting and conservation.... One day you can, one day you can't...doesn't make much sense to me. Either they are a problem or they are not. ;)
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
you need to be able to kill hogs anytime, day or night, deer season or not, with dogs or without.
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
Why are there no comments from farmers claiming that hogs are ruining their way of life? All these comments are from 'hunters' who just want to shoot pigs simply because they are there. Adults have self control to not have that itch to kill anything that moves. Work on self control. We have trapped for over 20 years with continued success and we have absolute control how may pigs roam our farm. Adults handle business with a level head, come on guys.
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
UHHH....Maybe because this is not a Farm Site? I think that I said that I live on a farm...

Trust me, farmers are not really the Internet commenting type! LOL
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
I tend to agree with the OP. However, not being able to take hogs at night from September through February does help me combat my ever constant outlaw problems. I know if someone is spotlighting in my area during those months, they are definitely doing something illegal. In fact, I caught a neighbor doing just that on the last day of deer season.

Allowing the taking of hogs by any means year round would surely help to maybe keep them in check. To be honest, I kill more during September through February than during the rest of the year, most being in October and November when the farmers generally cut the cane in my area. I do catch some slipping during the other months too, but not as many. I honestly do not do much hunting etc. during the late spring and summer months because... way to hot and I hunt in swampy land so... MOSQUITOES X10!!

I do believe it could be possible to open up the gates during the currently closed months on private land, provided that the hunters follow the rules of notifying the local law enforcement or something to that effect. Hell, I would bring the GW with me and he could bring his AR with him to help. My only concern on a hunting property is how such activity would affect the deer. I imagine a lot of riding, walking, and sitting in stands at night during deer season would have an adverse affect. On the other hand, for a farm that is not an issue. Don't take this to the bank just yet, but farmers might be able to shoot hogs when they please anyway as a nuisance animal, like coyote's attacking livestock, etc. I don't even know why farmers would have to have a hunting license to do such as it is not technically hunting and more like protecting his livelihood. Like I said though, you might want to call your local Wildlife and Fisheries Office before you try that on hogs! Don't bash me just yet, I have a good friend who is a GW, I'll ask him and get back to y'all.
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
SB..

I enjoyed your comments. I like to hear what other hunters are doing and thinking in Louisiana. One of the reasons that I sent my comments into the state and posted it here is that I believe that most hunters are good ethical people that follow rules. Yes, there are always some that relish in the fact that they can break game laws. With that said, I believe that we should eventually evolve into a state that uses common sense, science and data results to set our game laws not fear of the control of the hunting population.

Also, mosquitoes also limit the amount of time that anyone wants to hunt in the hot months. This is another good reason that makes sense for allowing hunting at night for hogs
during the winter months.

Look, I just don't believe in silly restrictions. As our laws are written now, if I am awakened by hogs or see them destroying the ditch in my front yard or tearing up my back yard between legal sunrise and sunset on February 28th and I shoot at them, I'm breaking the law! The very next day I'm legal. When you look at it this way, it doesn't make much sense.

Who knows, maybe if we start sitting in our deer stands at night during deer season, we will confuse our deer so bad they will no longer be nocturnal!! LOL

Thanks,
Duckaholic
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I agree. Here are the promised laws
I am still waiting for my GW to call me back, he worked last night so I imagine he is sleeping right now. This code article does not address feral hogs but is nonetheless informative of what a landowner can do without a license.

La. Admin Code. tit. 76, pt. V, § 125
§ 125. Control of Nuisance Wild Quadrupeds

A. This rule applies only to the control of the wild quadrupeds listed below and only when they are conclusively proven to be creating a nuisance or causing damage to property. The burden of establishing that the animal in question is causing the property damage shall rest with the property owner.

B. The following wild quadrupeds may be taken year-round without permit by the property owner or his designee, with written landowner permission, but only by trapping or shooting during legal daylight hours:
1. coyote;
2. armadillo;
3. nutria;
4. beaver;
5. skunks; and
6. opossums.

C. Squirrels, rabbits, foxes, bobcats, mink, otter, muskrat, raccoons and any of the other species listed above may be trapped alive and relocated to suitable habitat without permit provided the following conditions are met.
1. Written permission is obtained from the property owner where the animals are to be released and such written permission is carried in possession while transport and release activities are taking place.
2. Animals are treated in a responsible and humane manner and released within 12 hours of capture.

D. Traps shall be set in such a manner that provides the trapped animal protection from harassment from dogs and other animals and direct sun exposure.
E. Nuisance animals listed above may be so controlled by the property owner or his designee with written landowner permission, to prevent further damage.

F. Property owners must comply with all additional local laws and/or municipal ordinances governing the shooting or trapping of wildlife or discharge of firearms.

G. No animal taken under this provision or parts thereof shall be sold. A valid trapping license is required to sell or pelt nuisance furbearers during the open trapping season.

H. No species taken under the provisions of this rule shall be kept in possession for a period of time exceeding 12 hours.

I. This Rule has no application to any species of bird as birds are the subject of other state and federal laws, rules and regulations.

J. Game animals, other than squirrels and rabbits, may only be taken by hunting during the open season under the conditions set forth under Title 56 of the Louisiana Revised Statutes and the rules and regulations of the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

K. A permit may be issued to landowners or their designees to take white-tailed deer during the closed season when deer are causing substantial damage to commercial agricultural crops or orchards. Crops or orchards of less than 5 acres will not be considered for permits unless alternative exclusionary methods, including electric fencing, have been attempted and proven unsuccessful. Loss of 25 percent or more of the expected production or value of a crop must be documented by a Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry crop specialist or Louisiana State University Cooperative Extension Service agent. Emergency deer removal permits may be issued by Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Wildlife Division with approval by the Deer Program Manager and Enforcement Division. Landowners or their designees may take only the number of deer recommended by a Department of Wildlife and Fisheries biologist and specified on the permit. Only antlerless or unbranched antlered deer are legal for removal. All deer taken under this permit must be tagged in a manner specified on the permit before being moved from the site of the kill. Deer may only be taken during daylight hours and all deer meat will be salvaged and donated to a recipient or charitable organization approved by the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. Biological samples may be requested by Department of Wildlife and Fisheries biologists for research and health monitoring purposes.

More to come
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More
You know maybe sitting in the deer stand at night would help the nocturnal nature of those elusive bucks. Good Point. Here is more law. This also applies to landowners or those with permission of a landowner. Apparently for hogs you simply need a basic hunting license and you could 'trap' one today!

La. Admin Code. tit. 76, pt. V, § 130
§ 130. Feral Hog Trapping

A. Feral hogs may be trapped in cage or corral traps year-round by holders of a valid basic hunting license. Feral hogs may captured by use of snares year-round by holders of a valid trapping license.

B. Cage or corral traps must have an opening in the top of the trap that is no smaller than 22 inches x 22 inches or 25 inches in diameter. (for bears to escape)
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One more...
As of now feral hogs are not included in the following statute, but most definitely should be. So farmers CALL YOUR LEGISLATORS to have it amended. Feral hogs are treated the same in almost every other respect, why not under this statute.

La. R.S. 56:116.1 does allow farmers to take raccoon and opossums .22 caliber rimfire rifle when the animals are found destroying crops of corn, sweet potatoes, watermelons, pecans, and other crops, with no bag limit any time of the year. (not at night since it is not specified).

Squirrels found destroying crops of pecans may be taken year-round by permit, which shall be valid thirty days from date of issuance. (once again not at night and only with .410ga-12ga).

Notwithstanding the provisions of this Subsection to the contrary, any opossums, raccoons, nutria, otters, muskrat, mink, or beaver that are found destroying crawfish in a private pond primarily used for the purpose of commercially cultivating crawfish or destroying the structure of such pond may be taken as provided by law by the crawfish farmer or landowner with either a rimfire rifle no larger than a .22 caliber or a shotgun no larger than a 12-gauge using nontoxic shot no larger than BB-sized from a boat or vehicle with no bag limit any time of the year during daytime or nighttime hours.

Why aren't hogs included in this I do not know. They definitely have the potential to cause more damage than a raccoon or opossum, right? I suppose logic and reason went on a smoke break when they were writing all this new 'outlaw quadruped' law. I think it was simply glossed over by the almighty rule makers. I am sure if farmers and landowners hounded the legislators, they would add feral hogs to the list above without much fight at all. Sorry I kinda hijacked the thread a little and bombarded you all, but I think all this is very good information to know and share. All of the cited laws are up to date. Happy Hunting!
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
Don't call your legislators just show up to he public meetings that are scheduled. Wlf.la.gov is the website. Find where the meetings are and go and speak up
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
Or...Send them an email like I did! ;) The link is in the article here on this site.
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
SBLedHed, hogs aren't on that list because, legally, there is no such thing as a 'wild hog' under Louisiana law, they're all 'domesticated' ones that 'got out.'

You can already hunt hogs year-round on private property. Not sure about night.
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Feral = Wild
Hmmm Breambusta no offense, but you are most definitely wrong, all due respect. No such thing... but they apparently have laws regarding 'Feral Hogs'? Feral is defined as a 'wild' animal that descended from a domesticated animal. So yes we do have laws regarding 'wild' hogs. I just found it funny that in the 'Outlaw Quadruped' context hogs were lumped in with armadillos and coyotes, but not the list in the last statute I cited. Does that make sense?

I posted the related statutes and code articles mostly to provide information that most of us are not completely sure about or don't know at all. I know you can hunt hogs on private property year round, but you certainly cannot do such at night. 'Holders of a valid Louisiana hunting license may take coyotes, feral hogs where legal, and armadillos year round during legal daylight shooting hours.' Straight from LDWF. Known this since it was enacted years ago. You can ONLY do so at night from March 1rst through the last day of August. From September through February you cannot hunt at night for hogs, at least until Duckaholic sways LDWF to allow us ha ha ha.

What we were really discussing was why there are more restrictions on the taking of hogs in Louisiana. For example, Texas pretty much doesn't care how or when you kill them, just as long as you do your part. Now I know Texas has more hogs and more problems related to the huge population of them, but wouldn't we want to be more proactive and keep them in serious check before we get to the point of no return?

Bayouwild, you could easily go to the meetings, however, at least for revised statutes, only the legislature can enact and amend them, so why not hound those people we pay so much just in case they weren't that busy ha ha ha.
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
No offense taken sir. In fact I was hoping someone would correct if wrong.

Having said that, I stand corrected.
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
You weren't that far off. Feral can also describe an animal that was domesticated but escaped into the wild or something to that effect.

I sent my local reps. an e-mail that included a link to this forum. I will probably get some canned responses of 'Thanks for your concern, we will look into it.'
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Re: Feral Hogs and Night Hunting
I really don't see the problem. Hunt when you can at night, trap when you can't hunt. Trapping and hunting both have their uses and can be equally productive. Surely we can understand the reason why you can't hunt them at night during deer season.
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