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Bayou Black- untold story

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So I'm sure everyone rushed off to fish bayou black this weekend in light of that thrilling article that was written earlier this week. What was left out, as told to me by the LA continental land and fur co representative., is the the author of this article had been run out of this pond by them for trespassing. This comes around now, to my fishing party this mornjng. We were fishing a area in the marsh my father in law has for years. Suddenly we (and 3 other guys in the same area) were greeted by the fore-mentioned land owner's representative who proceeed to have a sherrifs deputy write all of the boat owners tickets for trespassing. He asked us if we had read the article 'on the sportsman' ,which I actually had not, stated that after seeing the article that was written by the fella he ran off, he knew there would be a slew of new trespassers today and he wanted to make an example of them for following the authors Poor advice. With all of that being said, I don't blame the author for the ticket the guy I was with received, but it seems like if your going to go through with an article like that when you had yourself been ran off for trespassing (and luckily got a warning only according to the representitive), it seems like you would add that bit of info to the story in the form of a 'fish at your own risk'. I also might add that the area we were fishing was not posted (I know that's not required by law anymore). This was about my second time fishing there; I will be in no rush to return.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Redfish, please don't blame the great people at the Louisiana Sportsman, you know you were in Terrebonne parish where they have made up their own laws on trespassing on tidal waters of the state of Louisiana! you do Know Louisiana is the only State in the Union where you can get arrested for Tresspassing on Tidal waters, and believe me redfish Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes are the worst!
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Greenhead I plainly stated I did not blame the author for the ticket; but if he has been ran off that would've been a nice addition to the article. I blame ludicrous land laws the state has passed.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
I know redfish, I am just sorry you got harassed by law enforcement for just trying to have a good time catching Bass or redfish. I will just never understand why another sportsman in this great State we live in would send someone out there to write a citation to someone for fishing in tidal waters. I could understand if it was in Duck Season and the fisherman were interfering with his hunt, but Summertime! What if you or the other 3 boats had kids with you and they were having a wonderful time catching fish and then their trip was ruined by the actions of a few greedy individuals, that my friends would be a tragedy.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Greenhead that's what we told them. I said it's not real season, so we're not even disturbing potentially resting birds. They didn't care, they simply just didn't want anyone back there. Sad and crazy.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Redfish, I cannot fish an area I grew up fishing in because of the same situation in Lafourche parish on the south side of Little Lake. If you go in those ponds and water patrol makes contact with you,you will be cited for trespassing on tidal waters of the State of Louisiana. Therefore I just don't fish there anymore and that is very sad I have wonderful memories of catching redfish and specks in that area and sometimes some very nice Bass.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Just curious.

What ponds or area were you in today
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
A canal off of the coppersaw not too far past the bluebird canal, I beleive the first canal on the left past the blue bird-- I've only been there twice with my father in law so I'm not overly familiar w the area.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
redfish, bayouratt85 said he never got run out or got a trespassing ticket in bayou black!
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
i said it in the other thread..

If you are fishing in the marsh in bayou black 99% chance you are trespassing.

Its just not a good idea to be in there. The more people keep getting caught in the marsh the more areas the land owners will lock down.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
I've been run out of areas of Bayou Black before also. The way it was explained to me is that if you have banks on both sides of the boat, your OK, but you are trespassing as soon as you enter the marsh at any point from a canal.
But there are also some privately owned canals that are legally posted. They all have signs.
Much of the marsh is leased by hunting clubs who encourage the owners to keep others off.
I love fishing that area and I wish their rules were published somewhere so more people could avoid going through the harassment!
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Not being from SE LA, It was shocking when I learned that 'our' wonderland of inshore marshes is not actually legally accessible to me. When I started fishing 4 years ago people said that the posted signs were just there for liability reasons. That's what you want to believe if your landless. If all the marsh land owners decided to enforce their rights, then we would have to buy rights to fish in the marsh. I for one couldn't afford to fish across 200 miles of marsh like I do now. That would be pretty boring in comparison to the popular vision of the Sportsman's Paradise. Of coarse the land owners would be in the same situation, left to fish limited areas. What about the camp owners who have rights to their camp parcel but not to go into the surrounding marsh? I'm just saying, what does fishing in SE LA look like taken to the greatest extent of the law?

I'm curious, how do guides deal with the land rights now? Does their revenue allow them to buy fishing rights to all the areas they take their clients?
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Heron - In this state, it is all about $$$$ or certain 'rights.' This law is in place and enforced because the deep pockets or the land owner goes deeper than the public. In cases where the pocket of the landowner is not so deep, it is replaced with a free pass to said 'Private Property.'
As for guides, some (not all) have access to these areas. I do not know if it is bought or deals are reached but some guides do have keys to gated canals/areas. I really do not blame them. Some of those canals are loaded with fish and easy for the picking. I just saw a picture of close to 100 sacalait taken from a gated canal somewhere in Houma. Trust me, if you would see it, you would NEVER believe that sacalait that big came from the marsh. And the person that 'owns' that area catches sacalait and bass like that all year long.
Welcome to Louisiana......that is the reason I will never fish that area again. Unless several thousand of us show up at the same time and all make a beeline for these 'Private Areas.' If that ever happens...I am there!
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
I think I understand most of this situation. Back where I come from the best activity was hunting. Public land was terrible hunting so my family has a 100 acres of hunting land which we managed. We invited friends to hunt also but it wouldn't work to let lots of people hunt on the land.

The part about the LA marshes I don't understand is that the general public thinks of the marshes as theirs. 'Save OUR marshes' and such. Who came up with that? When floods hit our hunting land or tree killing diseases and insects, there was no 'save our forest' movement. It seems like the culture which has grownup around camps, marsh life, etc. relies on the sharing of the marsh land by the big land owners. Will that culture fall apart if the land owners continue to patrol and enforce their rights?

So, putting myself in the shoes of the 0.01% (?) of the population the owns the vast tracks of marsh land, I need the general public to believe that its their marshes so I can get them to support $billions from state and federal agencies to save my disappearing marsh land. I presume this worked under the 'sharing' status quo, but I wonder what attitude the general public will have if the owners stop sharing their marsh? Just some food for thought.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
I can understand how land can be owned by people, but never will understand how water can be owned by people!!!! no-one, I don't care who they are or how much damn money they got, should never be able to own water!!! but like they say, money and power talks, and we got to walk!!!!JB, sounds like u don't trust our politicians too much????
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
What if your land turns to water?
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
This issue was challenged several years ago by a group known as ROWA. They lost the battle in court but following that the case was reviewed by a law professor at Tulane Law Center and it was opined that the plaintiff's counsel used the incorrect argument against the issue itself and as I recall there was some concern over the impartiality of the presiding judge. It was the opinion of the Tulane Law center that this issue could be settled in court in the favor of open access but ROWA ran out of money and it has not been challenged since.

I have spoken to the founders of ROWA in the past, they have aged and moved on to other interest but they have kept the movement alive and they are just waiting for someone to take the reins and rebuild it. I guess that people just have not gotten made enough about it to band together to raise enough money to 1) either have the legal opinion challenged or 2) lobby our legislature to change the laws as they are currently interrupted.

I for one would be happy to contribute to help fund your defense should ROWA or any other organized group make a good run at it.

I can't seem to find it at the moment but there is an attorney general opinion that may help you. Attorney General Caldwell was called on in the recent years to issue an opinion on a water theft case that involved the fracking industry in North Louisiana. As I recall the oil companies were sending vacuum trucks to roadside creeks to siphon water from the creeks to be used at the well. The Louisiana Attorney General issued an opinion (going from memory) that all waters that ebbed and flowed across all lands in the State of Louisiana belonged to the State of Louisiana and as such the oil companies were not allowed free access to the water to be used for a private purpose.

It seems to me that this AG opinion flies directly in the face of what is happening in the spillway and along our coast. Those waters ebb and flow, are capable of supporting commerce and according to the AG that qualifies them as being property of the State and its citizens.

As applies to our coastal waters and to address one posters comment about what happens to your land once it is taken over by water? My initial response is to do what I am doing - it is your responsibility to maintain your property. If you do not want it to sink into the sea then it is up to you to protect it. (just my opinion). Perhaps the larger question is now that Louisiana is preparing to spend BILLIONS of public money to rebuild sections of our coast; who is going to OWN that property? It is complicated as the law as currently written had a lot to do with the Mississippi River and allowing property built by the shifting river to remain private ownership but now man is preparing to physically build that property with money that belongs to you and I, how is it that they can allow Joe to claim ownership of that property?

I believe that this issue alone demands that our lawmakers undertake a total revamp of our riparian rights at which time we could address the navigable waters issue.

Once again, not knowing the facts of your case, should you decide to fight the legal fight, I would certainly contribute should others join in to make it a worthy effort.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
When this country was settled, the rivers, bays and lakes were the highways.... everything was moved by water. Whether is was coming down the Ms. River, or across the Gulf and marshes. England went to a national policy called Public Trust. Like all over Europe at that time... Lords and other Royalty actually took ownership of rivers coming through their domain, as well as coastal waters abutting their claimed property. Since they were an island nation with the world'd largest navy, and merchant marine shipping that traded all over the world....these goods also had to get into the various parts of that nation-- the country adapted a policy of lands affected by the ebb and flow of the tides as public. No matter if you owned the river banks... you could not stop commerce and travel on the river... or coastal marshes. No matter who owned these coastal areas... the use of them was always held in public trust. The U.S. adopted this early on, as they saw people trying to stop commerce and charge large fees to use a waterway. The very large and powerful entities that own much of our coastal marshes not only wanted the vast mineral rights under them, they wanted it all private... against the Public Trust Doctrine. They had to have a ruling to get around that... and since they control most of our legislators in Baton Rouge... they also hold sway with many Judges. A judge ruled in effect that it was like land.. even though it was affected by the tides. They also came up with hogwash about having to go back and look at maps from around the Louisiana Purchase in the early 1800's to determine if the area was state owned water bottoms????? These maps are lacking in so many ways. I always thought a natural bayou was always a state owned waterbottom bayou. But I started reading up on it, and it seems like the powers in the state set a size limit on what could be a natural bayou. So many chains wide.. a survey term.... about 60 ft. wide or wider is considered a state owned waterbottom... 60 feet or less, private. Now, that is some hokey pokey right there. Seems we are the only state out of the 50 that has restricted the use of our coastal areas like this. I sure hope one day... somebody will some deep pockets will challenge this.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Google this case it will explain most of it. DARDAR v. LAFOURCHE REALTY CO., INC
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
then I lose it!!!! I don't own the air over it, why should I own the water on it!!! I was a landowner not a water owner!!!
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
The problem with the ruling in the Dadar case... is what that judge determined what was a navigable waterway. In all the other state's cases I have read... those judges ruled... if a canoe can navigate that creek, river, or tidal marsh... it is navigable and state water bottom. They want to keep going back to 1812.... well in 1812-- 95 % of the craft that moved goods around were..... canoes.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Hope some lawer that likes fishing reads this letter.maybe there is some hope.
The water that moves with the tide should be public water.In my opinion.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Two older Attorney General opinions that support the fishermen are Opinion # 90-418 of 8/15/1990 and Opinion # 90-557 of 12/12/1990. You can google them. One even seems to suggest to the DA that asked for the opinion that it is the AG's opinion that the land owner could face charges for illegally posting the waterway.

I have not had time to go back and look for the more recent one that I mentioned in the earlier post.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Just a thought?

I'm no lawyer but it looks to me that it all boils down to the definition of navigable water. If navigable waters are bodies of water that are used for commerce all the canals dug by the oil and timber company were dug for the purpose of commerce. So that being said these canals should be for public use, and once a body of water is deemed navigable it is owned by the state and would not revert back to the land owner.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
That is not the main issue. The issue is some landowners think because their land erodes, they now own the water! I can understand the pain of having to pay taxes on something that does not exist. But to claim you own what does not exist is ridiculous.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
My 2 cents. I believe if you own/bought property on a waterway, (river , lake, coast) you are responsible to maintain that property. If water comes on your property by nature or man made, you do not own the water or its content, unless that water is landlocked. If you take public money (tax ) to restore your property, it is available to the public. I own property on a river and lake. Just my 2 cents.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
I think there are 2 main issues here

1. There are landowners posting places that are 100% public and they are in the wrong.

2. There are people going on places that ARE 100% private because they think because an area is navigable, it should be public.

Well, just because you can drive a boat into it, doesn't mean its public. When something floods, its navigable, but you have no business being there.

There are canals dug through land and attach to public waterways, that does NOT mean you have the right to go down that oil/gas canal because it is now 'navigable'. Yes it is a Right of Way, but the Right of Way is to the oil/gas folk and not tboy the duckhunter.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
But,,,,, the water and fish in that canal is public. Putting a gate/fence up does not make the water and fish private.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
The water and fish in that canal are public when they cross into PUBLIC waters.

Just like with deer, they belong to the public, BUT doesnt' mean you can go on PRIVATE land and shoot that deer that belongs to the public unless he crosses over the line
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
thats where i think its slightly different. land is land.

if i dig a pond on my property and connect it to a public pond do I now claim thefish and water that come into my pond private?
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
We have property in bayou black, on the north side of the intracoastal. Unfortunately, due to erosion, there are several cuts off of the intracoastal that have broken through the levi. About two month's ago, I'm fishing on my property, in the marsh, I look up and they have a bass boat running about 70 mph through one of my ponds. When he see's me, he gets off the step and can't get back up- I call the game warden, they come and write him a ticket - The canals on and around the property are one thing, but guys coming in the marsh is ridiculous. We have posted signs everywhere. They can't play dumb, but they try. I believe that this is the reason the canals are getting cracked down on. Give someone an inch, they take a mile. Everyone else suffers.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Here we go again...The 'guy in a bass boat running across my marsh got a ticket' story is getting old and I'm not sure if many people are really buying it anymore. 'Liquid land' owners and leaseholders need to get over it. You own/lease the land surrounding the water but if you're paying for the water then you're paying for something that the public gets for free. Not their problem that you made a terrible investment. Telling these stories about the tickets being issued by wildlife and fisheries is not an effective deterrent anymore. Wildlife and fisheries does not enforce civil matters. And just because you own marsh property doesn't mean that you can keep anyone out of the waters especially if it has an accessible waterway going into and/or out of it. If it does you will continue to see people there. Plenty of the canals that were dug by oil companies cut across navigable waterways and therefore the public has the right to use them. If that navigable waterway traverses into a pond it is not illegal for anyone to be there.

The public access issue will never go away until the State rules CLEARLY, one way or the other on the issue. There would be no controversy if the law was clearly written and a clear map of waters legally accessible to the public and waters only accessible to private landowners was made available. However the State makes more money leaving things just the way they are and takes the position that disputes are left between said landowner, said trespasser, and the local authorities (Sheriff's Office, not Wildlife and Fisheries). Property owners are paying their taxes on ownership and commerce and non-property owners are paying taxes on the money they spend to hunt/fish. Take either away and the State loses. This issue will not go away any time soon and may never go away.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Regardless of what you THINK the law should be (and I agree it needs to be looked into), the law is clear.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
JJOJ, I don't know what has changed since I left the LDWF Enforcement Division, but I can tell you this Wildlife and Fisheries DOES NOT WRITE TRESSPASSING CITATIONS!!!!! Why don't you just try getting along with your fellow fisherman and start worrying about all of the real OUTLAWS in your area which I can tell you there are MANY!
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
And another point, Jooj, Why would the guy in the Bass Boat come down off step when he saw you, my guess is he would have kept going. As I have stated before, Louisiana is the only state in the union to enforce trespassing laws on tidal waters and if you get down to it and read the law it is being enforced improperly!!!!!! I just wish all of the sportsmen in the state of Louisianan would start getting along and stop all of this.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
The real problem is no clear way to find out what is private and what is not. Not someone saying its theirs but a clear map. Also it should be mandatory that it is posted, if your tresspassing you get fined. On the other hand a land owner tring to post extra areas that don't belong to them or run people out of public areas should face an equal fine.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
lafisher, absolutely correct!!!! greenead1 u rite sheriffs dept writes trespassing tickets not ldwf!!! how can the sheriffs dept write a trespassing ticket when there are no posted signs or if there are posted signs, if the signs are even right???? do they just take the word of the landowner?? if they do that is wrong! r maybe they just know the landowner and not you? r just take the easy way out and don't want the hassle, so they just give tickets???
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
why should it be okay? when you put the time, money, effort, etc... to get the property the way I want it, over years. Why should people be able to come on it? Do you let people go deer hunting on your property after planting and cutting all summer....this is complete BS. people no their boundaries and if they break the law, they should be held accountable. And I do get along with everyone, especially fisherman. I'm an avid fisherman myself. I guarantee you won't catch me fishing in any posted marsh though. To do that is disrespectful and ignorant. As are you my friend.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
knowing where u at on land is a lot easier than on water!!!
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
You can't compare deer hunting to fishing tidal marsh. It's not apples to apples. The issue, especially with bayou black, is the owners took payment when the pipeline canals were dredged. Those canals are the second highest contributing factor to coastal erosion (in some cases it's the #1 cause.) Now the tax payers are footing the bill to repair the damage.

Let me ask you this; What are YOU doing to prevent erosion on your property? How much money do you spend per year restoring eroded property and preventing further erosion? Terrebonne Parish has some the worst land loss in the entire gulf coast. So in the grand scheme of things you're little lease means nothing. You can whine and cry and call the SO all you want but at the end of the day if you want your grand kinds and great grand kids to hunt/fish you need to stop being so near sighted.

CCA isn't going to help. DU isn't going to help. Delta Waterfowl isn't going to help. You can go to every banquet in the state and it means nothing. We need to give the power back to the people to restore the marsh. Landowners can keep their land, land being the key word. Keep your duck blinds. Keep your camps. The second you stop allowing people in the water is the second people stop caring and then it ALL washes away and you're left with nothing.

Personally I would like to see the marsh grass given protected status and put an end to all dredging and building. That's a little on the extreme end of things and unrealistic.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
My 2000 acres might not mean a lot to your or anyone else on here, but it means a lot to me, and the thousands of dollars I spend on it each year- controlling lilies, salvinia, etc... So when I'm fishing in my pond and a bass boat runs past me going out through a cut that is clearly labeled as posted - yeah it pisses me off. And when i'm frogging, and I have to run 2 or 3 boats out each time I go, yeah it pisses me off. And when people come on here and say they have the right to be in the marsh, wherever they want to be, yeah it pisses me off. You wanna fish in there give me some money! Other than that stay the hell out or the sheriff will be called on you!
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
So in other words you have not done anything to try and save the property from eroding?

As for your claims of constantly running people out of your 2000 acres, I just don't buy it. Knowing what I know of the area, the sheriffs department, and 25+ years being professionally involved in land management, your story stinks and I sincerely hope people do their own research and ignore your claims.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
if only you knew - it's people like you, who think you have to right to everything that is hurting everyone else. eventually, canals will be gated off and fisheries will be limited even more - Give people an inch, they take a mile - And if you know anything about the area, you should know about the troubles with people poaching for frogs and trespassing for fishing. If you know nothing about that, then you know nothing. I've been in my current area for more than 15 years. It's never been worse than it is now.

Believe that.

Please, don't listen to me, though. Just trespass and poach. No Worries.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
And as for erosion problems - I have none- I have water control structures all around my property. I do however have issues with giant salvinia and apple snails. I am trying to maintain the value of the property with an extensive spraying regimen - nothing I can do about the snails.

The area is a great place for fishing, hunting, sight seeing, ect... My property is gated - all the way around, chains have been broke, gates have been jumped - levies have been broken - So yes, it aggravates me. It's a constant battle
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
I get your frustration but you're missing the big picture here. Those gated canals are causing damage. They are causing massive amounts of land loss. You can not afford to fix the problem so the tax payers are paying your tab.

You have it in your head that people are violating your rights but what you're missing is your private canals are destroying everything else around them. Yet all you care about is people accessing your private ponds. Well guess what, those ponds would still be private if we were not experiencing these erosion issues.

You can cry all you want but people are tired of paying for your neglect. The public is more informed than ever and they are starting to realize the issue and they do not care about your property.

Are you still going to complain when your property is nothing but open water?

In 25 years of coastal restoration work I have not met one single land owner who has spent one red cent on stopping the problem. However, I have met many whom have spent six figures on posted signs...
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
jjoojj!!!! that's a good idea you got!!!!! if the land or marsh is legally yours, why don't you sell permits for people to buy, so they can go fishin and frogging legally on your property??? where is your property located at??? u mite make a bunch of money??
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Sorry,
I was looking at this on personal level.
Property is in bayou black on the north side of the instracoastal.

Should of never become involved on this thread.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
So are all the game fish in your private ponds in your possession? Are you over the limit?
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
No the fish are free to swim wherever they please. I do not own them - they are free.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Also would you support a earthen dam around your property to block all tidel movement there??
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Jjoojj, so which one is it? First you say you have erosion in some spots and then you say you have no erosion problems
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
I think jj's comments are eroding too!!!!
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Bayou Black - the story appears to be told - because there is coastal erosion, everyone should be able to trespass on each others land - all gates should be torn down - this will prevent erosion - marsh should be open to the public - canals should be open - land will grow - coast will be saved

give me a break - ignorance at it's best - funny
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
You keep mentioning the word ' land '. We are talking about areas covered with water.... tidal waters. The other 49 states follow the Public Trust Doctrine.... any areas covered in tidal waters are available to the public, no matter who buys them or owns them. I believe you mentioned you had a water control system on your marshland... who paid for this??? That is what is truly great about this mess. Even the big oil companies and land companies want to suck on public taxpayer tit for repairing/re-building 'their' marshland. I say the public need to pressure 'our politicians' to bring this up to a vote. Any marsh owner who want public funds to save 'their' marshland need to approve public usage. If they do not, we do not spend one dime on them. This is not a deal like interior dry land ownership... this is tidal marshlands.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Yep sorry for the argument.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
ROCKNET!!! great comment!!!!!! 100% right!!!!
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
Rocknet this will never happen as the have excess for them an family. Just think if you have water with gates how could the game wardens get into tis property lol.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
We are blessed to live a paradise for fishing hunting crabbing shrimping etc.. the possibilities and areas to fish in the marsh are endless. Luckily we can avoid areas where greedy 'land' owners think they own tidal waters. We just need to move a little to the left or a little to the right or a little back or a little forward to be in a place in the marsh where a whiny 'water' owner person cant bother us. And enjoy the gift God has given all of us, with our family friends and especially our children while they are young.
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
http://reut.rs/1JkWxCd

https://shar.es/15jF69

http://www.louisianasportsman.com/details.php?id=8832
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Re: Bayou Black- untold story
The public trust doctrine was adopted by the country after seeing what England went through with the Lords and such having total control over every acre of ground there, including the tidal areas.... which were of extreme importance for shipping, fishing, and traveling. England came up with that doctrine. No matter who bought , sold, or held the tidal areas.... the public always had right of use. Now, the ones who own these tidal areas go by the Golden Rule... whoever has the Gold.... Rules. It is the way this state is set up and has been for generations. When the oil companies came... so did the greed. Nobody much cared before then... but now.... it is just like England and Europe. You must be born into a family, the right family... to have the use of the tidal areas. It is why I dislike the CCA so much. They could have made a difference in the fight for our rights... but their only interest really lies with the well heeled folks, and not the peasants. They only need public membership to exist as a non-profit and pretend to be helping future generations... mainly with a little reef project every now and then or something similar. I will not tell them what they can do with those reefs...
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