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Opinions on tandem kayaks

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Looking for opinions of the following tandem kayaks; Ocean Kayak Malibu two xl, Vibe 12t skipjack, Perception Pescador 13t. I've researched all, but wanted some advise from the pros here. Main area of use will be out of Grand Isle, ponds, bayous, and coastal marshes. Is there a particular company I should avoid, or are they all quality products? Use will be taking kids fishing; educational purposes.
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I think a canoe would be a better choice. Get one with space for an ice chest in the middle that can double as a seat. I own several kayaks and have demo d manny tandem kayaks. For exploring with 2 or 3 it's the best choice.
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Jackson kayaks 'big tuna' is a great tandem yak. Self bailing is something to consider in rougher water.
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I've used both canoe (Old Town Guide 147) and tandem kayak (Native Ultimate 14) in the marsh. If you fish 2 people, that particular canoe is very tough to beat. It's made of the same polyethylene used in most yaks. I even add a trolling motor to it sometimes and that makes it so much nicer coming back to the launch in 90 degree weather.

If you fish solo, the canoe is an option only on days with wind < 10 knots otherwise it's a bear. The Native on the other hand converts to solo and does quite well in windy conditions and is quite fast and tracks well. It's also very light for a tandem. However, it's a kayak-canoe hybrid so if you want to fish big waters like the surf you'll need to go SOT (sit-on-top).

As suggested, the Jackson Big Tuna is a great SOT option. There are a few others including the Hobie Tandem where you pedal instead of paddle. I'm not sure the Hobie T converts to solo, but the Big Tuna does.

For the money you'll spend on most tandem yaks, I'd suggest getting BOTH an Old Town Guide 147 ($750) for 2-person fishing, and a solo yak like the new Perception Pro 120 ($800) or Pelican Catch 120 ($700) for 1-person fishing, and you still break even or come out ahead.
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