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After several years of disappointing Duck Hunting, I've began to deer hunt (try). I have a 2 Arpent wide by several hundred yards long of what I call floating marsh grass. I see plenty of signs of deer along the canal that borders the marsh. I'm 150 pounds and I can barely get through the marsh with out sinking. I have a few questions to ask you fine Gents. Do you think the soft, flooded marsh holds deer? Is there a technique I can use to put up my 13ft tripod stand so that the legs do not sink? Is there something I should be doing through spring/summer to provide protein for the deer? Any help would save an aging newbie a lot of trouble.. Thanks, in advance!
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   slickhead
Deer can walk on that floatant marsh fairly well. I have seen people take a 4 x 4 piece of plywood and lay on the floatant and place corn on it for the deer. This was all done by airboat. The stands they used were very tall to see over the grass. They had punched through the grass and set their posts way down into he mud to build their stand. It's very tough hunting
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   seagu11
Find a good deer trail and follow it, most of the time you want sink, do remember, deer are not scared to get wet and sometimes you have to crawl out over that stuff to retrieve a deer(getting wet). For the Tripod legs, cut some 18in. to 24in. plywood disc for the legs to land on, but need some kind of spike on bottom of legs to hold them in place.
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Thanks for the comments. Do y'all think there is a hard ground underneath at a certain depth?
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   seagu11
Sometimes, but how deep is the question only you can answer by trial and error.
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I've hunted in similar. What we've done make a good ditch with the mud boats with a turnaround at the end. Put the feeder at the end and stand at the beginning. Of course we were lucky enough to put our feeders upwind, lol. Anyway, the deer come up for their last meal, drop them where they stand, and pull the boat right up to them. The bad part is it doesn't always work out that easy. Keep your waders in the boat, but I agree with the other comments about trial and error. You gotta learn what you have and where you can go. I would advise not learning it when it's 20 degrees outside. Oh yeah, we did hire a guy with an airboat to lay the grass down in the high grass to make nice shooting lanes too. Just be patient and you'll get your shot. Maybe the other guys could answer better, but out there I think the only think you could put out on the 'off season' would be like mineral blocks or something like that. We didn't do anything but start filling the feeders with soy beans in September. Hope this helps...
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   puppys
First, where you see all the deer and hog tracks, put up a stand on the levee. If you want to hunt in the marsh, good luck.. We used to take aluminum step- ladder and drag it in the thickest wax mrytlebunch we could get to without sinking, too much a cut a little trail for you to use to come and go. remember you have to come and go and sitting on top that latter, is cold. Those deer only come to the levees at night unless they are spooked by something.. We killed a few deer and some were monsters, but you better have a good rope and a strong buddy with you. Or 2. Worst drag in world.. We used a push-pole or cut a nice sixe willow tree and tie the legs of the deer to the pole and when one of us went down the other just waited until you both could take a few steps.. The average person, no way with out plenty of help.. GOOD LUCK
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