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Bow hunting food plots

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What are some ideas for a early season bow plot?
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Re: Bow hunting food plots
Plant a combination of wheat, oats, white clover, black oil sunflower and Cowpeas (Iron/Clay peas). Plant two weeks before the opener. The sunflower and Cowpeas won't last long but will be a strong early season draw. The wheat and oats will sustain the plot after the candy is gone. And the clover will provide food in the Spring and early Summer.
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Re: Bow hunting food plots
My early season bow plot is my all year plot. Glyphosate (roundup) plot 3 weeks before you want to plant and about 1 week after the most recent mowing. Disc or no till and plant mid September. That gives it 2 weeks to grow before season starts and even though its not thick or tall at season start, the deer still hit it well. I think the smell of fresh turned over dirt attracts the deer as well as anything else initially. Plant your food plot blend of choice. I like Buckbusters Fall Mix or Premium Mix which has clovers, mulitlple rape types, peas, wheat, oats and maybe a few others and the premium mix adds in plantain and chickory. Like the blend Huckleberry mentioned above, one nice thing about these designed blends is they provide something tasty at all times throughout the season and into spring and also the clovers are nitrogen fixing and add a little of it to the soil. Also having the right pH of soil and adding the proper fertilizer is very important. You can get a quick soil analysis and see where your soil is and adjust it some still, however adding lime to adjust pH takes time. Pelletized lime reacts faster at adjusting pH but you'd have to check into it to see if its quick enough at this stage to make a difference by bow season. Regular lime takes about 6 mos and I think pelletized takes about 3 mos but don't quote me on that. Hopefully your pH is good (6.0 or above) already and thats not a worry. Also just fyi, I see guys go buy 8-8-8 fertilizer bc its cheaper than 13-13-13 without really understanding what they're doing. The 3 numbers just tell you how many pounds of each component are in a 100 pound sack. So there are 8 pounds each of nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium in 100# of fertilizer as opposed to 13 pounds of each in 100# of triple 13. So you get 62% more fertilizer in triple 13 than triple 8 and so you don't need to buy as much triple 13 which saves you money. Good hunting!
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Re: Bow hunting food plots
Thanks for the great ideas guys
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