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Catching but can’t be picky

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After some vacation time I was back fishing Saturday and Sunday with Jack Legendre crew. I had Stevo, Brent, Hunter, and Grant both days. Saturday we had prefrontal conditions, strong south winds, high water, and incoming tide. We found a slow trout bite but it just enough to keep us at it for most of the day. All our trout were caught with Glow Matrix Shad under a cork in about 2-3ft of water. We took a peek at some heads and reds but the front pushing thru pushed us in before finding much.
Sunday was completely opposite with low water, high north winds and a falling tide. Water was actually cleaner with the falling tide but the trout bite was slow and instead of the cork they wanted the glow Matrix Shad slow on the bottom in 5-6ft of water. Since the guys had some fried Sheepshead the night before the guys were good ditching the trout for the heads. We made two stops and found a colony of the heads before the guys called it so they could get home for the Saints game. The trout bite has been slow so it’s thats time of you want to catch you go after whatever bites. Thanks Capt. Marty for setting up the trip.

Capt. Travis Miller
985-981-6434
Miller-timefishingcharters.com
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Re: Catching but can’t be picky
I'll take Sheepsheads over specks any day of the week. Not as easy cleaning as trout, but the best eating marsh fish there is.
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Re: Catching but can’t be picky
Sheepshead definitely get a bad name. Most clients either tell me they haven’t had them before or like them but don’t like cleaning them. But when you have me cleaning them I always say load the box 😂
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Re: Catching but can’t be picky
They are harder to clean but not too much with the proper setup. People are just spoiled by easy-to-clean trout. But sheephead are definitely the best-tasting inshore fish. As I recall, Cap has a brute-force rickasaw :) but for the rest of us, just have a serrated knife and a boning knife handy. Take advantage of the 'groove' along the backbone to avoid the scale with the boning knife, work around the rib cage, then use the serrated knife for the final cut behind the head. Boom! Fantastic fillet.
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