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Hogzilla 2 ????

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MONTGOMERY, Ala. - Hogzilla is being made into a horror movie. But the sequel may be even bigger: Meet Monster Pig. An 11-year-old Alabama boy used a pistol to kill a wild hog his father says weighed a staggering 1,051 pounds and measured 9-feet-4 from the tip of its snout to the base of its tail. Think hams as big as car tires.

If the claims are accurate, Jamison Stone's trophy boar would be bigger than Hogzilla, the famed wild hog that grew to seemingly mythical proportions after being killed in south Georgia in 2004.

Hogzilla originally was thought to weigh 1,000 pounds and measure 12 feet in length. National Geographic experts who unearthed its remains believe the animal actually weighed about 800 pounds and was 8 feet long.

Regardless of the comparison, Jamison is reveling in the attention over his pig, which has a Web site put up by his father — http://www.monsterpig.com — that is generating Internet buzz.

"It feels really good," Jamison, of Pickensville, said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press. "It's a good accomplishment. I probably won't ever kill anything else that big."

Jamison, who killed his first deer at age 5, was hunting with father Mike Stone and two guides in east Alabama on May 3 when he bagged Hogzilla II. He said he shot the huge animal eight times with a .50-caliber revolver and chased it for three hours through hilly woods before finishing it off with a point-blank shot.

Through it all there was the fear that the animal would turn and charge them, as wild boars have a reputation of doing.

"I was a little bit scared, a little bit excited," said Jamison, who just finished the sixth grade on the honor roll at Christian Heritage Academy, a small, private school.

His father said that, just to be extra safe, he and the guides had high-powered rifles aimed and ready to fire in case the beast with 5-inch tusks decided to charge.

With the pig finally dead in a creek bed on the 2,500-acre Lost Creek Plantation, a commercial hunting preserve in Delta, trees had to be cut down and a backhoe brought in to bring Jamison's prize out of the woods.

It was hauled on a truck to the Clay County Farmers Exchange in Lineville, where Jeff Kinder said they used his scale, which was recently calibrated, to weigh the hog.

Kinder, who didn't witness the weigh-in, said he was baffled to hear the reported weight of 1,051 pounds because his scale — an old, manual style with sliding weights — only measures to the nearest 10.

"I didn't quite understand that," he said.

Mike Stone said the scale balanced one notch past the 1,050-pound mark, and he thought it meant a weight of 1,051 pounds.

"It probably weighed 1,060 pounds. We were just afraid to change it once the story was out," he said.

The hog's head is now being mounted on an extra-large foam form by Jerry Cunningham of Jerry's Taxidermy in Oxford. Cunningham said the animal measured 54 inches around the head, 74 inches around the shoulders and 11 inches from the eyes to the end of its snout.

"It's huge," he said. "It's just the biggest thing I've ever seen."

Mike Stone is having sausage made from the rest of the animal. "We'll probably get 500 to 700 pounds," he said.

Jamison, meanwhile, has been offered a small part in "The Legend of Hogzilla," a small-time horror flick based on the tale of the Georgia boar. The movie is holding casting calls with plans to begin filming in Georgia.

Jamison is enjoying the newfound celebrity generated by the hog hunt, but he said he prefers hunting pheasants to monster pigs.

"They are a little less dangerous."

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Are you serious???????? How does something like that go with out being seen or heard??? Thats alot of pig!!!
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And he's ten times the size of a panther.
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That little dude has to be happy!!!!!!
I bet he will not want to eat pork for a long time.
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   STEAMBOAT
I heard that the Pig got in a fight with 2 bears and won!
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Don't know if thats true,but If it did I bet it won!!!
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Check out the story on the website listed above. Also, check out the positive and negative comments left to an 11 year old kid. The negative ones were unbelievable! There are some really sick anti-hunters out there. I know this young man's father, and they are good people. No kid deserves to be sent messages like that!! I'll probably get a little sausage off of porky, and I'll let y'all know how it is!!
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that's .... phew... ain't no way to explain that thing...
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   killadaux
I saw the kid on Good Morning America this morning with pictures of the hog. He said they made over 500 pounds of sausage. I hope that sausage is edible. About 20 years ago, a friend killed a 500 pound wild boar. The meat was so strong and rank, they had to throw the pot away after they cooked some of the hog. Those black iron pots are great to cook with, but they have a tendency to absorb the odors of what you're cooking in it.
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I can certainly attest to the negative comments on the hog's website. It's unbelievable what some of these whacko's write about ANY hunter, much less an 11 yr old kid.
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I read a bunch of those negative comments on the kid's website. Wackos man. Plain and simple. And they can't see the illogic in their arguements. I hope the kid's parent's, pastor and friend give him wisdom to deal with it and that crap doesn't freak him out. It could be an excellent opportunity for him to grow into manhood and take hold or life and his theology for himself.

Ed
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   BangFlop
Wow what a 'hunt'. With his father and two guides looking over his shoulder with rifles aimed at the thing It sounds like a set-up to me. Just can't understand the excitement over killing a freak pig with a $1525.00 50 caliber pistol. Reminds me of those Jimmy Houston videos.

Impressed with the pig, not the 'hunt'.

just my 2 pennies worth
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   fishhead
I agree. He should have just shot it in the barn and avoided the commotion. Chased it for 3 hours?? with 2 rifles aimed at it?? BS!! NOBODY can chase a wild hog for three hours unless it's in a fence. That's no wild hog
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   BangFlop
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -- State wildlife officials said Wednesday they want to know how the huge hog dubbed "Monster Pig" got into a fenced hunting preserve where it was chased down and shot to death by an 11-year-old boy.

The young hunter is not accused of doing anything illegal, but the head enforcement officer for Alabama's wildlife agency said agents are trying to determine if anyone broke a state law prohibiting the transportation and release of live feral swine.

"There are some questions about where the animal came from, how he got there, how long he'd been there," said Allan Andress, enforcement chief for the Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division.

Andress said officials also will review whether the hunt complied with the state's "fair chase" law, which requires that prey at hunting plantations have a reasonable chance of escape.

Eddy Borden, the owner of the spread where the hunt occurred, declined comment on how the hog got into the 150-acre fenced-in area where it was killed last month by Jamison Stone of Pickensville.

Borden said he was getting tired of questions about the hog, which Jamison's father said weighed 1,051 pounds and measured 9 feet, 4 inches from the tip of its snout to the base of its tail. The kill drew international attention.

"I didn't ask for the publicity. I just want it to all go away," said Borden, whose Lost Creek Plantation is located in east Alabama.

Keith O'Neal, one of the guides who accompanied Jamison and father Mike Stone on the paid hunt, said he was unsure if the super swine was placed in the enclosure or grew up it.

Jamison was hunting with his father and the guides on May 3 when he killed the giant pig. He said he shot the huge animal eight times with a .50-caliber revolver and chased it for three hours through hilly woods before finishing it off with a point-blank shot.

Mike Stone said neither he nor his son did anything wrong.

"It's an 11-year-old boy who went hunting," said Mike Stone. "He was enjoying all the attention at first, but it's all getting old."

Andress said there is nothing illegal about a child hunting in Alabama.

How long do you think it would take a pig to grow to 1000+ lb on 150 ac.?
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I would have noticed a 300 lb. pig on 150 fenced in acres. This is exactly why so many people are against high fences. I still say if it makes you happy, great. Just don't promote this stuff to everyone. Oh yea, congrats on a great hunt ??
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   BangFlop
THE latest on the pig, from the anniston star.

hmmmmm ...

FRUITHURST — Before he became known as “Monster Pig,” the 1,051-pound hog shot in Delta was known by another name.

Fred.

Rhonda and Phil Blissitt state, on April 29, four days before the hog was killed, Fred was one of many livestock on their farm.

Late Thursday evening, their claims were confirmed by Andy Howell, Game Warden for the Alabama Department of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries.

“I didn't want to stir up anything,” Rhonda Blissitt said. “I just wanted the truth to be told. That wasn't a wild pig.”

Added Phil Blissitt: “If it went down in the record book, it would be deceiving, and we'd know that for the rest of our lives.”

The monster hog gained worldwide acclaim after he was harvested by 11-year-old Jamison Stone, a Pickensville native, with a .50-caliber pistol on May 3 at the Lost Creek Plantation, LLC, a hunting preserve in Delta. The big boar was hunted inside a large, low-fence enclosure and fired upon 16 times by Stone, who struck the animal nearly a half-dozen times during the three-hour hunt.

The Blissitts said they were unaware that the hog generating all the media attention was once theirs. It wasn't until Howell spoke with Phil Blissitt that the pieces of the puzzle came together.

Phil Blissitt recalled Howell asking him about the now-famous hog.

“Did you see that pig on TV?” Phil Blissitt recalled Howell asking him. “I said, 'Yeah, I had one about that size. He said, 'No, that one is yours.'

“That's when I knew.”

Phil Blissitt purchased the pig for his wife as a Christmas gift in December of 2004. From 6 weeks old, they raised the pig as it grew to its enormous size.

Not long ago, they decided to sell off all of their pigs. Eddy Borden, owner of Lost Creek Plantation, purchased Fred.

Attempts to reach Borden were unsuccessful.

While Rhonda Blissitt was somewhat in the dark about the potential demise of her pet, Phil Blissitt said he was under the understanding that it would breed other female pigs and then “probably be hunted.” Many other of their former pigs — like their other farm animals — had been raised for the purpose of agricultural harvest.

As the Blissitts recounted the events of the last two days, they told stories and made many references to the gentleness of their former “pet.”

From his treats of canned sweet potatoes to the how grandchildren would play with him, their stories painted the picture of a gentle giant. The even talked about how their small chihuahua would get in the pen with him and could come out unscathed.

“But if they hadn't fed him in a while,” Rhonda Blissitt said, “he could have gotten irate.”

Phil Blissitt said he became irritated when they learned about all the doubters who said photos of Fred were doctored.

“That was a big hog,” he said.

The information of the pig's previous owner came out on the same day that officials from the Fish and Wildlife concluded their investigation of the hunt. They concluded that nothing illegal happened under the guidelines of Alabama law.

Allan Andress, enforcement chief for the Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division, said they derived the hog's origin as the investigation unfolded.

“We were able to determine that he came from a domesticated environment,” he said. “So, he was not feral to start with. Therefore, he would not violate our feral swine trapping and relocating rule.”

Mike Stone, Jamison's father, contends that he was unaware of the origin of the pig. Before, during and after the hunt — and up until late Thursday night, when contacted — Mike Stone was under the impression that the hog was feral.

“We were told that it was a feral hog,” Mike Stone said, “and we hunted it on the pretense that it was a feral hog.”

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In no way could this be considered a "fair chase" hunt. However, i can't bash a dad for getting his son in the woods. He could of been sitting at home updating his MySpace page, playing playstation, vandalizing something, or just being some punk a** kid. At least he was out in the woods. I see this no different than when i was a kid and we would go to the pasture and watch the old man up the street shoot, then process a young steer we would raise all year. Had free beef all year. They got pork!
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The negative ones were unbelievable! There are some really sick anti-hunters out there. I know this young man's father, and they are good people.

- Towing Service
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   drdiddy10
O..EM..GEE!!! How many shots did that take? Concrete epoxy flooring
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   Kirami
I'll keep an eye out for more posts like this. Drift Boss is a fun driving game that you can play online. Its allure can keep you driving for hours. The further you progress, the higher your score will almost certainly be.
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   Monark10
Photo shopped.
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