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Marsh/Swamp Hunting Question:

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Question to all the marsh/swamp hunters:
I recently got in a lease, and it's mainly flooded cypress/tupelo swamp with a large stretch of freshwater flotant marsh traversing it. I walked the marsh, and saw a lot of deer trails through it with a few small rubs. The flooded timber is wide open with about 2 feet of water, and the marsh is floating and stays pretty dry in some areas, with about 4 foot tall brown maiden cane grass and bull tongue. My question is, will the deer bed out in that marsh grass rather than the timber? I never jumped any deer in the marsh but they had lots of trails. Where should I hunt???the swamp or the marsh? I could cover a lot of ground on the marsh, but was just wondering if they only use that at night and if they'll bed out in it. How would you hunt this set-up?
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both
THEY WILL BE IN BOTH, YOU JUST HAVE TO FIND THE HOTTEST TRAIL, AND YOU CAN SET A CAMERA UP AND SEE WHICH WAY THEY ARE COMING FROM AND TIME AND THEN MOVE TO THEM AS THEY COME IN THE DAYLIGHT.
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Marsh, deffinately.
There are probably some patches and strings of wax myrtle bushes in the marsh, concentrate on those with a tripod stand. The deer will also use tall stands of cat tails to travel during the daylight. Sounds like some good area you are in. Bring some good binoculars and scan constantly!!!!!!!!
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Both
Like Eric said, find the hot trail coming out of the marsh, should look like an asphalt hwy. or if the have green seeds in the swamp, look for a steady break in them winding through the trees. Set up away from the hot marsh trail, not to be busted by the wind and get where you can see out into the marsh and the swamp. Deer like to layout in the marsh grass on a cold sunny day and chew their cud. The only way they will be in the trees is if they have big logs or high spots to lay on, but they will suprise you and seem to come out of no where.
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Bring your weedeater
Find a spot in the marsh, yet close to the swamp where there are several heavy trails. Cut out a circle rough 50' in diameter. Throw a feeder in the middle and load it with corn. Set up a stand about 100 yards away where you can see them traveling in and out of the swamp and also see the feeder. Set up the stand S/E of your feeder so the winds from the North and west won't affect the hunt with your scent. Cut a couple of small poles willow about 1" - 2" in diameter and about 12' long. Stick these in the marsh by the feeder. A buck in the area will rub the poles. As soon as your poles show horn hooks, start sitting int he stand. Bucks tend to travel on the edges of the swamp where it meets the marsh. If you have the time and energy, use the weedeater to cut several shooting lanes out in the marsh a distance away from your stand. Deer tend to use man-made lanes in the marsh pretty quick after they are cut.

After about a week, you will likely begin seeing deer at the feeder every evening after 4:30 until dark. The closer it gets to the rut, the better chance you will have in seeing a buck hanging close to the feeder.

For what its worth, that's the set up I use. I have 8 stands set up in this manner and they are very productive.

If you don't have time to set up a feeder and work with a weedeater, simply find a point, where the swamp juts out into the marsh and set up a stand just S/E of the point.

Another tactic.. Find the HEAVY trails in the marsh and use the willow poles on the sides of these trails. The bucks will rub the poles on their regular trails after a few days. Set up and hunt these trails.
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.
There's no thick groves of myrtles...just a few here and there. The cypress tupelo is fairly open woods. Do yall find more deer coming from the marsh or the timber?
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The edge
Hunt the line where the marsh and swamp meet. Find a well used trail at this point and set up. The deer will lay up in the marsh during the day and you can catch them coming and going morning and afternoon. You have an ideal situation to hunt wet fronts. Trust me don't let the rain keep you out of your stands. It is amazing how easily these deer walk the flotan marsh, which is humus basicly rotted vegetation matted together floating on open water. They curl their hooves and run on their legs not to bust through.
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yeah
They do move good in the marsh. A few years ago I was able to compare the hooves of a doe killed in Red River to one killed in the marshes of Terrebonne parish. Both deer were the same age. The Red River doe was 20 lbs. heavier in body size, but the difference in the hoof size was amazing. The marsh doe's hooves were easily 2 times the size. Evolution at work I guess.
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